The Gloria Dei Pipe Organ (view from balcony)

The Gloria Dei Pipe Organ

The Gloria Dei Pipe Organ

The Gloria Dei Pipe Organ

Schoenstein Pipe Organ, Opus 145

Our Schoenstein Organ, Opus 145, was crafted in San Francisco, CA. We are appreciative to Jack Bethards, the head of Schoenstein Organ Company, Thomas Murray, Yale Professor and University Organist, and Jack Levick, Organist and Choir Master of The Plymouth Congregational Church in Lincoln, NE who were most helpful in the design of this instrument. The organ console has four manual keyboards and a pedal board.

The sounds on the organ are produced by eighty ranks of pipes. Each stop on an organ, such as the trumpet or flute or diapason, has to have a pipe for every single note that is played. The collection of pipes that make up the sound, for instance, of a trumpet, etc., are called a rank. Each rank consist of 32, 49, 61 or 73 individual pipes except for the mutation stops which can have up to 266 pipes such as the Mixture stop in the Swell Division. This pipe organ is able to produce a wide range of dynamics because a considerable number of pipes are placed under expression in chambers behind the façade. The face of these chambers have shutter shades on them that are able to be controlled by the organist from the console thus opening up the sound of the pipes in the chamber to the main church and making them louder. Two of the divisions, the Swell and the Solo, have additionally enclosed interior chambers so there are pipes that are able to sound twice as soft as those sitting in the front or first enclosure. The façade of the organ soars some fifty-six feet above the nave floor and flanks either side the Rose Window.

A 40-page full color booklet describing the organ and the dedication events is available through St. Martin's Music Department for $10.00 plus shipping and handling; call 713/985-3838.

To see pictures from the Parade of Pipes on February 8, 2004, please click here.